Thursday, 14 February 2013

European Dragons

There are many different species of dragon. In all continents of the world there have been myths about some sort of giant lizard or dragon. For this reason I am going to split it into several sections; European, Chinese, Americas (North and South), Japanese, Asian, African, Mediterranean, and Australasian/Oceanic dragons. This post will focus on the dragon more well known to Europeans and the western world.
The European dragon has large wings that enable it to fly great distances and at great altitudes. They are of a leather-like material with thin hollow bones to support the structure and shape of the wing, much like a bat's wing. The body of the dragon is covered in hard scales of varying colours, from brown to gold, and blue to red. The colour of the scales does not appear to have any significant meaning, although golden dragons usually seem to be the leaders. This is not however always true. The body can measure up to 50 metres in length at times, although a more common length is around 20, and it is around the height of a two storey house. Their tails are also covered in scales and are much like that of an overgrown lizard. The tail in itself is about a quarter of the length of the body. All European dragons can breathe fire as of the age of around 6 months, the amount and duration increases with age and strength. Underneath their scales they have a tough brown skin, very similar to leather. Unlike their scales it is however easily cut with a sword or spear.
Dragons live forever unless killed, which is highly unlikely. Dragons are well protected with scales and their fire allows them to remove most threats. They are also very fast and strong, as well as being able to fly. To kill a dragon you would have to find a weakness in its scales, then try and pierce the thick skin. This is usually only possible with a spear, but even they would have to be stronger than a normal spear.
Dragons do not mate for life, preferring to wander alone. They can only produce young after around 50 years. The female lays large eggs after mating, the colour of which depends on the dragon inside. Male dragons are rarely found in a group other than during the breeding season, whereas females are often in large groups of up to 10 at a time. The females do this to be able to guard the eggs laid, which will hatch after around a year. Each female lays around three eggs, but one of these usually fails to hatch. No-one knows why this happens, and if the dragons themselves do they do not intend to make us aware.
In conclusion, dragons are intelligent creatures, with a sophisticated and complex lifestyle. You do not want to cross blades with one!
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4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Cool, I'm doing a project on dragons, but my browser blocks all the decent pages because it has detected a threat. When are you doing the rest of the dragons?

Sean Smith said...

I'm not sure yet. I am doing research on the Chinese dragons at the moment, and it should be ready within the next week. After that it will probably be Mediterranean. Which do you need the most?

Anonymous said...

I need info on all of them, but the American dragons I cant seem to find much info on.

Sean Smith said...

Ok, I will do what I can.